A prompt success

I was observing some TV auditions recently where the presenter had to read from a prompt, and I felt some sympathy for the fragile performer under the glare of lights and onlookers reading from a screen – where it isn’t easy to scan entire sentences at once. Intonation, understanding and communication were made tricky for the presenter who faced unseen text and clunky sentences lacking sufficient punctuation and correct grammar –  and that were somewhat overlong. (Like the above!)

Where was the poor presenter going to pause for breath, let alone smile?

Presenters, when faced with reading from a prompt you can ask for a hard copy in advance – unless it’s for a broadcast journalism job where coping with breaking news is part of the skillset. If you familiarise yourself with the text before the audition it will be much easier to read from a scrolling screen because you will know what is coming next. If you’re not happy with the pace of the text or your performance during the screen test, don’t reveal this in your face or eyes (until after you hear the word ‘Cut’).

The scripts in your hand and on the prompt are from the same file, so look out for typos, overlong sentences and pronunciation issues before you face them on screen. Check punctuation, commas and full stops, read aloud to see where you can take a breath. Talk to the viewer, don’t read to them, and look through the words to find the camera lens.

Production teams, are you guilty of writing corporate speak, jargon or tongue twisters? Fine for reading alone, but not aloud. As TV is a conversational medium, try reading your scripts aloud before you press save, and spare a thought for presenters who can deliver a much better performance if given a little prep time beforehand.

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