TV Presenter training – not just for TV presenters

One thing I love about teaching TV presenting is the range of people it attracts. On my last course at The Actors Centre, which was fully booked, there were two Dancing on Ice professional skaters, a Reuters journalist, musical theatre actor, former actor working in events, IT consultant, blogger, and marine engineer. They all had different reasons for attending, with mainstream TV presenting not necessarily being the end goal for all of them.

Certainly, I’ve trained people who’ve gone on to have high profile TV presenting careers including Seema Jaswal Sports presenter BBC and ITV, Julia Chatterley financial reporter/anchor CNBC, Bloomberg and now CNN, David McClelland Tech broadcaster on BBC’s Rip Off Britain and Watchdog, Sita Thomas children’s presenter Channel 5’s Milkshake, Louise Houghton presenter Euromaxx for Deutsche-Welle TV and Marie-Francoise Wolff, Kipling bags brand ambassador QVC.

There are dozens more of my former students who’ve achieved success using their presenting skills online such as Asian Media Awards Finalist presenter/writer Momtaz Begum-Hossain @the_craftcafe, flower expert Rona Wheeldon @flowerona, vegan cook Suzanne Kirlew @kirleysueskitchen, storyteller Lucy Walters at lucywalters.uk.com, Dr Clare Lynch businesss writer, udemy.com and Matthew Bellhouse Civil Engineer, winner Fleming Award for Best Presentation at The Geological Society.

People use TV presenting training in all kinds of ways, not always for TV, to build up their brand, vlog, make marketing videos, create their own content channels, to speak to camera with confidence and understand professional expectations.

TV Presenter training can help launch your media career and enable you to speak to your audience wherever it might be. There are people who are confident enough to start broadcasting to the world from their kitchen table, some with huge success, but for others it feels better to get some expert feedback and learn how to get it right before you do.

Kathryn teaches TV Presenter training in Covent Garden London at The Actors Centre and City Lit, and in North West London for one2ones.

 

 

 

Am I too old to be a children’s TV presenter?

After teaching a recent TV presenting course I was asked by a thirty something if he was too old to be a children’s TV presenter.

It depends how you connect with your viewers and which target audience you are aiming for.

Some wonderful TV shows for younger viewers feature more mature casting including James Bolam in Grandpa in my Pocket, and Lynda Baron in Come Outside – both shown on CBeebies.

CBeebies is the channel for viewers under 6 years, their presenters tend to be maternal, paternal, aunt or uncle figures who can reassure the viewers whilst entertaining them. Popular and long-lasting CBeebies presenters include Justin Fletcher (Mr Tumble) Chris Jarvis and Pui Fan Lee who are all mid-forties and have presented children’s programmes for around 20 years. Justin Fletcher was made MBE in 2008 for services to children’s broadcasting, and won a BAFTA Award for Children’s Presenter in 2012. Currently he presents Something Special and Justin’s House, and Chris Jarvis and Pui Fan Lee present Show Me Show Me.

CBBC is aimed at children from 6 to 12 years, although older children watch the shows. Their presenters tend to be youthful, sometimes looking like teenagers themselves. Current popular presenters include Blue Peter’s Lindsey Russell, Sam Nixon and Mark Rhodes from Sam and Mark’s Big Friday Wind-Up, Scrambled’s London Hughes, Arielle Free, Luke Franks and Sam Homewood, and Katie Thistleton from CBBC presentation.

Children’s TV presenter Gemma Hunt demonstrates how to move successfully between the different children’s channels. Gemma studied Media Performance at the University of Bedfordshire and as soon as she graduated she started presenting with CBBC – her many credits there include Xchange, Barney’s Barrier Reef and Bamzooki. In 2013 almost 10 years after joining CBBC, Gemma moved to CBeebies to present Swashbuckle the pirate themed pre-school game show. In 2015 Swashbuckle received a BAFTA for Best Entertainment show at the Children’s Awards and filming has just finished on the fourth series. As a young presenter, fresh out of University CBBC was the natural home for Gemma, and as she matured her style was ideal for CBeebies.

Different audiences demand different presenting styles, as ever, it’s about knowing your brand. So, my answer to the question, am I too old to be a children’s presenter? You’re never too old to be a children’s TV presenter!

Once a children’s TV presenter, always a children’s TV presenter?

Advice from Kathryn Wolfe, Course Leader TV Production, Senior Lecturer Media Performance University of Bedfordshire, Pukka Presenting trainer and author ‘So You Want to be a TV Presenter?’

I received an enquiry this week from a presenter asking if she pursued her love of children’s TV presenting would she always be labelled as a children’s presenter? As a director on many children’s TV programmes, including Tweenies, Teletubbies, Record Breakers, Jackanory and Playschool, I’ve worked with many of our best loved children’s presenters. Some spend a long career in children’s programmes, some pass through, and like Phillip Schofield, leave the ‘broom cupboard’ behind them ….

Holly Willoughby

Fearne Cotton

Andi Peters

Ortis Deley

Jake Humphrey

Chris Tarrant

Konnie Huq

Matt Baker

Becky Jago

Noel Edmonds

John Craven

Maggie Philbin

You can try being a children’s TV presenter for a day.  See Children’s TV Presenting Course, City Lit, Sunday 17th October 2010.