TV Presenter training – not just for TV presenters

One thing I love about teaching TV presenting is the range of people it attracts. On my last course at The Actors Centre, which was fully booked, there were two Dancing on Ice professional skaters, a Reuters journalist, musical theatre actor, former actor working in events, IT consultant, blogger, and marine engineer. They all had different reasons for attending, with mainstream TV presenting not necessarily being the end goal for all of them.

Certainly, I’ve trained people who’ve gone on to have high profile TV presenting careers including Seema Jaswal Sports presenter BBC and ITV, Julia Chatterley financial reporter/anchor CNBC, Bloomberg and now CNN, David McClelland Tech broadcaster on BBC’s Rip Off Britain and Watchdog, Sita Thomas children’s presenter Channel 5’s Milkshake, Louise Houghton presenter Euromaxx for Deutsche-Welle TV and Marie-Francoise Wolff, Kipling bags brand ambassador QVC.

There are dozens more of my former students who’ve achieved success using their presenting skills online such as Asian Media Awards Finalist presenter/writer Momtaz Begum-Hossain @the_craftcafe, flower expert Rona Wheeldon @flowerona, vegan cook Suzanne Kirlew @kirleysueskitchen, storyteller Lucy Walters at lucywalters.uk.com, Dr Clare Lynch businesss writer, udemy.com and Matthew Bellhouse Civil Engineer, winner Fleming Award for Best Presentation at The Geological Society.

People use TV presenting training in all kinds of ways, not always for TV, to build up their brand, vlog, make marketing videos, create their own content channels, to speak to camera with confidence and understand professional expectations.

TV Presenter training can help launch your media career and enable you to speak to your audience wherever it might be. There are people who are confident enough to start broadcasting to the world from their kitchen table, some with huge success, but for others it feels better to get some expert feedback and learn how to get it right before you do.

Kathryn teaches TV Presenter training in Covent Garden London at The Actors Centre and City Lit, and in North West London for one2ones.

 

 

 

Acting v TV Presenting

Many TV presenters come from an acting background or combine acting careers with presenting. What’s the difference? Acting is taking on a persona, getting under the skin of another character, portraying someone who is not you. TV presenting is being you, don’t try to be someone else or act the role of being a presenter.

Acting for camera teaches ‘Don’t look at the camera (unless a soliloquy)’, but TV presenters should look at the camera to engage with their audience. Actors can have weeks of rehearsal time, TV presenters rehearse just before the recording/transmission. Actors are almost always given a script, presenters may get a script or work from bullet points, research notes, a brief or just ad lib. Actors usually have a wardrobe department, presenters often wear their own, but on some bigger jobs I have known presenters to be given a budget or stylist, it  depends on the production.

There are transferable skills between acting and presenting, similarities and differences but if you are having a bad day in either profession, you will need to draw on your performance skills to keep it professional. Is presenting acting? Well, just a bit …..

More tips in my blog and book

https://www.nickhernbooks.co.uk/so-you-want-to-be-a-tv-presenter

Energy Tips

What kind of energy do you need as a TV presenter? I don’t mean energy to go to the gym, or jog around the park, but on-screen energy.

If TV presenting is being You, then just be your everyday normal self in front of the camera and you’ll be presenting. Right? Well yes, but there is some value in TV presenting as if you are the host of a dinner party, with a bit more oomph than in real life and a twinkle in the eye.

Too little energy, and your performance could be dull; too much energy and you could be OTT (over the top) and irritating to the viewer. So, how do you know what level of energy is right for TV?

You need to use your judgement, because in the world of TV you may not get director’s notes. Prepare beforehand by recording your work to camera and playing it back on a large monitor to evaluate your performance. Does it seem sincere, are you shouting, are you making distracting facial expressions, is the performance engaging, or flat and boring?

Unlike theatre, in TV there is no need for larger than life facial or vocal performance. Unlike public speaking, in TV you should not be casting your gaze around the room. On video/TV you are only speaking to one or two people at a time, via the camera, so speak to them as if they are positioned where the camera is.

Over the years I’ve trained hundreds of different presenters, and have identified two opposites in on-screen energy (as a generalisation of course). Actors from musical theatre often have performances that are too big for TV; they are used to reaching out to their audience, to be seen and heard at the back of the amphitheatre. What works on a musical stage does not necessarily work within the confines of the video screen, and I usually find I ask them to tone it down, to do less.

On the other hand, people from management consultant backgrounds often deliver video performances that are flat – perhaps because they’ve been trained to reduce the emotion in their performance, keep a neutral expression and take the heat out of the situation. Here, I often find myself asking presenters to raise their energy level, to do more.

When practising TV presenting you need to apply the right energy to the situation, for example, Newsreading and Children’s presenting require very different energy levels. But, as a general rule, on TV and video take care not to be too musical theatre or management consultant!