TV Presenter training – not just for TV presenters

One thing I love about teaching TV presenting is the range of people it attracts. On my last course at The Actors Centre, which was fully booked, there were two Dancing on Ice professional skaters, a Reuters journalist, musical theatre actor, former actor working in events, IT consultant, blogger, and marine engineer. They all had different reasons for attending, with mainstream TV presenting not necessarily being the end goal for all of them.

Certainly, I’ve trained people who’ve gone on to have high profile TV presenting careers including Seema Jaswal Sports presenter BBC and ITV, Julia Chatterley financial reporter/anchor CNBC, Bloomberg and now CNN, David McClelland Tech broadcaster on BBC’s Rip Off Britain and Watchdog, Sita Thomas children’s presenter Channel 5’s Milkshake, Louise Houghton presenter Euromaxx for Deutsche-Welle TV and Marie-Francoise Wolff, Kipling bags brand ambassador QVC.

There are dozens more of my former students who’ve achieved success using their presenting skills online such as Asian Media Awards Finalist presenter/writer Momtaz Begum-Hossain @the_craftcafe, flower expert Rona Wheeldon @flowerona, vegan cook Suzanne Kirlew @kirleysueskitchen, storyteller Lucy Walters at lucywalters.uk.com, Dr Clare Lynch businesss writer, udemy.com and Matthew Bellhouse Civil Engineer, winner Fleming Award for Best Presentation at The Geological Society.

People use TV presenting training in all kinds of ways, not always for TV, to build up their brand, vlog, make marketing videos, create their own content channels, to speak to camera with confidence and understand professional expectations.

TV Presenter training can help launch your media career and enable you to speak to your audience wherever it might be. There are people who are confident enough to start broadcasting to the world from their kitchen table, some with huge success, but for others it feels better to get some expert feedback and learn how to get it right before you do.

Kathryn teaches TV Presenter training in Covent Garden London at The Actors Centre and City Lit, and in North West London for one2ones.

 

 

 

Geeks, Boffins and Experts

Being a geek is cool – it’s also a sure fire way to get near the top of the TV presenting pile. If you are an expert without TV presenting experience you can get training and interest an agent. If you’re a general TV presenter without an area of expertise you can spend months trying to be seen.

We live in the age of the TV expert. Whether it’s on niche channels or mainstream, experts give authenticity to a production. Just look at how many current presenters have qualifications and/or life experience in the genre they are working in. Celebrities and known faces are being outnumbered by specialists, buffs and boffins.

If you’re a female expert you’re even better off. In recent years BBC schemes trained up a widening pool of talented women media experts from Economists to Engineers, Art Historians to Scientists, and there was a BBC training scheme earlier this year for BAME (Black, Asian, Minority Ethnic) women experts.

TV and media researchers seeking experts can only offer you work if they know you exist. Be visible. Accept invitations to speak at public events, present conferences, write articles, be interviewed for print, video or radio. Upload your details to websites used promote experts such as findaTVexpert.com, beatvexpert.com, thewomensroom

But, sincerity in performance is still key. You need to be passionate about your area of expertise, don’t become an expert just because you’ve read it can help your career, be the expert who loves being the expert, the boffin or the geek!

5 top tips for your TV presenting career

It’s been a while – I’ve been busy writing my second book – and I’m thrilled to say it’s just been published! The TV Presenter’s Career Handbook by Focal Press is out now. It’s packed full with advice and interviews with TV presenters, agents and TV producers on how to carve a TV presenting career. Here are my 5 top tips.

Be yourself

You are unique so don’t try to copy other presenters. Create your own showreel material with content that shows your own personality and style. Producers want to find new talent, not poor versions of existing personalities.

Use your expertise

Do you have specialised knowledge or qualifications? Whether it’s finance or cookery, music or sport, interior decoration or wine tasting your expertise can open doors. Be the guest expert, the interviewee or presenter who has credibility in a subject and you’ll more employable.

Take control

No need to wait for job adverts, start presenting. Upload to YouTube, be the face of the company you work for, or add videos to your website. As camera equipment and editing software becomes less expensive and more accessible it’s easier than ever before to start presenting from home.

Create a digital footprint

Use social media but have something to say. Join sites that promote your skills, be visible and contactable. Seek opportunities to raise your profile, you can be the interviewee not necessarily the presenter and still make a splash. Producers are increasingly searching online to find new faces.

Get some professional training

There are plenty of short courses out there, and a few Universities teach TV Presenting. Find out what the industry expectations are by training with experts. Go for the courses that really teach you the skills.